mountain men and the fur trade of the far West
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mountain men and the fur trade of the far West biographical sketches of the participants by scholars of the subject and with introductions by the editor. by Le Roy Reuben Hafen

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Published by A.H. Clark Co. in Glendale, Calif .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Fur trade -- The West,
  • West (U.S.) -- Biography

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsF592 H2
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14296205M

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This volume brings to the general reader brief biographies of eighteen representative mountain men, selected from among the essay assembled by LeRoy R. Hafen in The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West (ten volumes, )/5(15). LeRoy R. Hafen () was Professor of History at the University of Denver and Brigham Young University, Executive Director of the State Historical Society of Colorado, and author/editor of numerous books on the American West, including Ruxton of the Rockies, Fur Trappers and Traders of the Far Southwest: Twenty Biographical Sketches, and Handcarts to Zion: The Story of a Unique Western 5/5(1).   Mountain Men were the principal figures of the fur trade era, one of the most interesting, dramatic, and truly significant phases of the history of the American trans-Mississippi West during the first half of the 19th Century. These men were of all types—some were fugitives from law and civilization, others were the best in rugged manhood; some were heroic, some brutal, most were adventurous. HAFEN, LeRoy R. The Mountain Men and the Fur Trade of the Far West. Biographical Sketches of the Participants by Scholars of the Subject ans With Introductions by the Editor. Glendale: Arthur H. Clark Co., 10 vols. Illus. maps. A fine, untrimmed set in orig. cloth. A very difficult set to obtain.

  The legendary mountain men--the fur traders and trappers who penetrated the Rocky Mountains and explored the Far West in the first half on the nineteenth century--formed the vanguard of the American empire and became the heroes of American adventure/5(3). The legendary mountain menthe fur traders and trappers who penetrated the Rocky Mountains and explored the Far West in the first half on the nineteenth centuryformed the vanguard of the American empire and became the heroes of American adventure/5. Ross, Alexander: The Fur Hunters of the Far West. Chicago: The Lakeside Press, First edition. Near fine in dark green cloth covered boards with gilt text on the spine and bright gilt decorations on the front board, a gilt top edge to the text block with minor rubbing to the cloth at the head of the spine. A mountain man is an explorer who lives in the wilderness. Mountain men were most common in the North American Rocky Mountains from about through to the s (with a peak population in the early s). They were instrumental in opening up the various Emigrant Trails (widened into wagon roads) allowing Americans in the east to settle the new territories of the far west by organized wagon Activity sectors: Rocky Mountains, Sierra .

86 rows  This is a list of explorers, trappers, guides, and other frontiersmen of the North American . Get this from a library! Mountain men and fur traders of the Far West: eighteen biographical sketches. [LeRoy R Hafen; Harvey L Carter;] -- Chapters on: Manuel Lisa, Pierre Chouteau, Jr., Wilson Price Hunt, William H. Ashley, Jedediah Smith, John McLoughlin, Peter Skene Ogden, Ceran St. Vrain, Kit Carson, William Sherley (Old Bill).   The book is part of Hafen’s volume study of mountain men and the fur trade, although this particular volume is a bit shorter than the others in the series. I would highly suggest checking out The Fur Trapper website for a breakdown of some of the stats on mountain men from Hafen's works.   Mountain Men were the principal figures of the fur trade era, one of the most interesting, dramatic, and truly significant phases of the history of the American trans-Mississippi West during the first half of the 19th Century. These men were of all types&#;some were fugitives from law and Pages: